Spare The Scare

Presented by the Federal Trade Commission, the National Association of Attorneys General and the American Automobile Association The best way to avoid auto repair rip-offs is to be prepared. Knowing how your vehicle works and how to identify common car problems is a good beginning. It's also important to know how to select a good technician, the kinds of questions to ask, and your consumer rights.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the American Automobile Association (AAA), and the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG), this kind of information about your automobile may help you keep a lid on mechanical mistakes.

For more information, contact the Federal Trade Commission; the main office of your local American Automobile Association (AAA) motor club, listed under AAA in the telephone directory; or your state Attorney General’s Office of Consumer Protection. Check the Blue Pages of your telephone directory for the phone number, or check www.naag.org for a list of state Attorneys General.

The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.